State schools

The spending gap between private and public schools DOUBLE

The great divide between classes: Spending gap between private and public schools DOUBLE as they spend £6,500 more per pupil, study finds

  • Students in private schools spent almost twice as much on them as in the public sector
  • The Institute for Fiscal Studies found that the gap has doubled over the past decade
  • Study finds private school tuition has risen 23% over the past 10 years
  • Meanwhile, government spending per student had fallen by 9%










According to one study, students in private schools spend almost twice as much money as their peers in the public sector.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies found that the gap has doubled over the past decade.

While private tuition fees increased by 23%, public spending per student fell by 9% in real terms after inflation.

This meant the average private school tuition last year was £13,600 while state spending per pupil was around £7,100 – a gap of £6,500. In 2009-10 private school tuition fees averaged £11,100 and state spending £8,000, a difference of just £3,100.

Students in private schools spend almost twice as much money as their public sector peers, study finds (stock image)

The widening gap may partly explain why most public schools cannot keep up with the private sector in terms of grades and college admissions. Private schools on average pay higher salaries to teachers, pride themselves on having small class sizes and can usually afford better sports facilities.

Last night, teachers’ unions seized on the numbers to demand more government money for public schools. Geoff Barton, from the ASCL Chiefs Union, said: “It’s outrageous… The funding gap between the two sectors has always been there, but the fact that it has grown so wide still sticks in your throat.

“This means that while public schools have been forced to reduce things like subject choice, pastoral support and extracurricular activities – and with secondary class sizes increasing – independent schools have been able to improve their offer. in all of these areas. Private schools in England have seen the biggest increase in top GCSE and A-level grades this summer compared to other schools.

Campaigners say well-resourced fee-paying schools have been able to offer better online learning during the pandemic than the public sector.

Luke Sibieta, author of the report, said: “Private tuition fees are now more than 90% higher than average spending per pupil in public schools in England. Tuition at private high schools is about three times higher than funding per student at public high schools.

“The long-standing concerns about inequalities between students in private and public schools, which have been highlighted during the pandemic, will not begin to be easily resolved as long as sectors have such different levels of resources.”

A spokesperson for the Department for Education said: “This government is delivering the biggest increase in funding for schools in a decade – £14billion in total over the three years to 2022-23.  This includes a £7.1billion increase in school funding by 2022-23, compared to 2019-20'

A spokesperson for the Department for Education said: “This government is delivering the biggest increase in funding for schools in a decade – £14billion in total over the three years to 2022-23. This includes a £7.1billion increase in school funding by 2022-23, compared to 2019-20′

The report, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, analyzed the average net fees of private schools in the UK – minus grants and rebates – and public school spending per pupil in England.

The analysis highlighted that expenditures varied from school to school.

Despite the increase in private tuition fees over the decade, the number of students in the schools has “not budged much”, according to the report.

Private tuition fees have increased in recent years due to increased demand from the super-rich in countries like China and Russia.

These families are willing to pay top dollar for a British education, but also expect state-of-the-art facilities that are expensive to build.

A spokesperson for the Department for Education said: “This government is delivering the biggest increase in funding for schools in a decade – £14billion in total over the three years to 2022-23. This includes a £7.1billion increase in school funding by 2022-23, compared to 2019-20.

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