State schools

Mandatory Covid-19 rapid tests for public school and kindergarten staff – Doha News

According to the weekly report from the Ministry of Public Health, the number of average daily cases in the community and among travelers has decreased slightly this week.

Staff and employees working in public schools and kindergartens are required to carry out mandatory rapid Covid-19 tests to detect viral infections in the new 2022-2023 school year, health authorities have announced. from Qatar.

This includes both administrative and educational employees and encompasses those who have been vaccinated or have already contracted the virus. The rapid test must be completed less than 48 hours before the start of school hours.

Staff can obtain rapid self-examination tests for the Covid-19 virus free of charge from health centers affiliated with their workplace starting this week.

Employees will then be required to submit the results to the designated school nurse.

Health authorities have also highlighted the need to follow up with school management, to ensure that all employees commit to completing the pledge form, to track positive and negative case statistics. within the school.

Qatar’s new school year begins next week.

According to the weekly report from the Ministry of Public Health, the number of average daily cases in the community and among travelers has decreased slightly this week.

No deaths have been reported in the past seven days.

Meanwhile, official figures on Monday showed 712 positive cases among the community and 107 among travellers. This follows a surge in numbers in recent weeks that led to the reinstatement of mask mandates in Qatar.

Global Rise

Around the world, there has been a noticeable increase in daily Covid-19 infections as more countries ease pandemic-related restrictions.

At the end of July, the director general of the World Health Organization (WHO) Tedros Ghebreyesus has said the pandemic is “far from over” with an increase in Covid-19 deaths over the past five weeks.

The WHO official urged the international community to vaccinate the groups most at risk, including 100% of health and care workers and 100% of the elderly.

“We continue to urge all countries to strive to achieve the 70% immunization coverage target, with an emphasis on targeted immunization strategies that prioritize the most vulnerable, which is the most effective way to save lives,” he said.

Reuters reported on July 13 that there had been a spread of the BA.5, which is part of the Omicron variant. The variant is responsible for 52% of cases worldwide at the end of June, with the United States accounting for up to 65% of infections.

“BA.5 has a growth advantage over other circulating Omicron sublines,” Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO technical lead on COVID-19, said earlier this month.

The WHO has been tracking the variant since April, having initially identified it in January this year and does not appear to be more dangerous than other Omicron variants.

“We have plenty of evidence that people who have been infected with Omicron are infected with BA.5. There is no doubt about it,” said Gregory Poland, a virologist and vaccine researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, quoted by Reuters.